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Scousemouse

BROWLOW HILL WORK HOUSE

no date sorry

Charles Dickens is reputed to have used this as inspiration for the workhouse in Oliver Twist. Hence the character Mr. Brownlow.


This is where the cathedral now stands
brainbox

I reckon that 1st pic is about Circa 1966 or 1967 Scousemouse as The New Cathedral looks pretty much completed and I think the old building would not be left standing very long as it would have spoilt the vista.

The 2nd shot showing the Arial view of Mount Pleasant and Brownlow Hill areas. is sometime prior to 1930 ,and if the same photo was taken today virtually nothing shown in it apart from the bottom right hand corner turning from Mount Pleasant into Hope Street would be seen remaining standing.
Barbie

They'll be opening up them workhouses again before long. Torys!!!!!! I hate them!
Scousemouse

Barbie wrote:
They'll be opening up them workhouses again before long. Torys!!!!!! I hate them!

Dont start me off
I never used to but now i must agree with you they have no compassion for any body ,
And next time they say that they suport our troops I will LOL becouse in yesterdays spending reivew what did they do , cut defence budget by another 2% and increase foreign aid by 3%  surly our defence comes before any foreign air how is that supporting our troops
Barbie

They disgust me! UKIP all the way....  Wink
Scousemouse

Barbie wrote:
They disgust me! UKIP all the way.... Wink

either that or give Liverpool home rule q33
Scousemouse

Barbie wrote:
They disgust me! UKIP all the way.... Wink

either that or give Liverpool home rule q33
Scousemouse

deleat
Scousemouse

[quote="Barbie:33614"]
Barbie

Scousemouse wrote:
Barbie wrote:
They disgust me! UKIP all the way.... Wink

either that or give Liverpool home rule q33
q56
brainbox

Shocked  Shocked
What happend o the Workhouse theme  >
q27
Barbie

Laughing

Anyone see Secrets of the Workhouse on t.v. the other night? Blimey, it was worse than I thought!  Confused
brainbox

I caught the lats of it Barbie, It was harrowing wasnt it. I tuned in at the point where that woman went back to trace her Grandmother who had been at the workhouse to have her illegitamit children, which I think was a common use of them during their existance.
That woman looked like she had a plastic face Shocked
Barbie

That was Barbara Bradford Taylor, writer of novels. She was quite shocked at the lowness of her heritage. Her grandmother was in service though, a fate of many a young servant girl!  Confused
MOJO

Here it is,awaiting demolition,in 1931.




Barbie

1931? The cathedral wasn't being built until 1962.
brainbox

The Crypt was Barbie. and then war intervened and money ran out, hence the 1960s design we have today
Barbie

I'm confused. As usual.... Laughing
brainbox

Thats nothing Barbie, look how long the Anglican one took to complete..  Those Holy Houses arent rushed are they  he ! he !
Barbie

Hang on...Mojo has a pic of the workhouse along side the Met cathedral, he says it is awaiting demolition in 1931. So, as the Met wasn't around in 31.......if you arent confused by me now, then good on ya... Laughing
brainbox

Oh yeah. Got Ya now, sorry . you never miss much do ya.
Dunno. maybe that buildimg wasnt part of the Main Workhouse..?? Good point barbie... maybe MOJO knows the answer to that one
brainbox

Or its Photoshopped   Shocked  Shocked
Barbie

Shocked

Maybe it was originally done just as a comparison pic?
Scousemouse

OMG now i am milixed up the pic MOJO put up was my original pic that started the thread and BB you dated it 1966 q48
MOJO

Ha,10 out of 10 all,for observation!! Smile The workhouse was, demolished in 1931,for the original Lutyen's design,but as B.B. said finance became crucial,and a cheaper version was designed,and delivered,years later,in 1967! Obviously,though I didn't click,at first,one had gone before the other! And you are right S.M. you did post this first!
Scousemouse

meal time in the workhouse
[url=http://gallery.myff.org/gallery/1587315/image.jpg][/url
When visited in September, 1832, it contained 1715 inmates, and can accommodate in winter, 1750. The present governor has had the management about twenty-eight years : on his appointment in 1804, there were 800 inmates; no separation of the sexes, only five weaving-looms, and no other employment for the paupers beyond the necessary business of the house. The doorkeepers were paupers, who frequently took bribes for admission, and the house was altogether in a most disorderly state. The governor procured a paid doorkeeper, separated the sexes as completely as the nature of the building would permit, except in cases of married people, who had small apartments allotted to them ; he also exacted from each person able to work, a reasonable portion of labour daily, for which purpose dry picking of oakum was introduced : this is a tedious and irksome process of manual labour, by which junk, old shipping-ropes cut into pieces a few inches long, is untwisted, the yarns separated and reduced to shreds by the hand and fingers, and by rubbing against the apron worn by the picker : there is nothing unwholesome or straining in this employment, but it is tiresome, and various attempts were made to evade it : one mode tried was by boiling the junk in water, after which it is easily pulled into shreds, but the ropes lose their efficacy to resist water, and consequently the oakum is unfit for caulking, its destined use. The introduction of labour thinned the house very much : it was sometimes difficult to procure a sufficient supply of junk, which was generally obtained from Plymouth; when the supply was known to be scanty, paupers flocked in ; but the sight of a load of junk before the door would deter them for a length of time.
The children, nine years of age, are taught to weave, and their time is divided between school and the looms; under this system they thrive better, and the instruction they get in weaving promotes their being apprenticed. The choice of the children is complied with as far as possible in apprenticing them; some are bound to tradesmen, tailors, shoemakers, &c., some go to sea, but the largest proportion, until recently, went to cotton factories, where most of them were bound to persons of respectability ; on leaving the workhouse, they are told to send information if they are not well treated. It is easy to ascertain how those fare who were apprenticed in Liverpool, and the others are visited by some of the overseers usually every year, but at all events once in the course of two years. The apprenticing and visitation of the children is occasionally adverted to in the Reports of the select vestry. Instances not unfrequently occur of individuals who have served their time with credit, calling at the workhouse or at the select vestry, and stating that they are able to earn a comfortable subsistence.
The inmates of the workhouse were formerly allowed to go out every Thursday afternoon ; this permission led to many irregularities, the paupers frequently returning drunk, and begging or otherwise misconducting themselves in the streets to the scandal of the establishment. They also used to go out on Sundays to church, but a chapel has been built within the work- house and a regulation was adopted in 1831, which restricted the liberty of leaving the house to the first Thursday afternoon in every month, except in the case of paupers upwards of sixty years of age, who are still permitted to go out every Thursday. The Catholics go out to chapel at eight every Sunday morning, and return at ten. Thus, one condition of entering this workhouse is submission to constant confinement, except for a few hours every month.
The rooms are well ventilated, floors kept clean, and sprinkled daily with chloride of lime, and the walls frequently whitewashed. Although the cholera has been so prevalent in Liverpool, only nine cases occurred up to Sept. 6, 1832, in this establishment; four of these proved fatal, one being the case of a pauper who, before his admission, had been employed as a bearer of the litter in which cholera patients were carried to the hospital.
The governor lays great stress on classification generally, and on a complete separation of the sexes ; there are lock-wards for males and for females in this establishment, and the governor thinks them essential to prevent the most depraved inmates corrupting or annoying decent and orderly paupers : in the small houses, in which two or three married couples live together, those of congenial habits and character are placed together.
When the workhouse was visited, some of the boys and girls were busy weaving, but the greater part of them were in a spacious school-room under the chapel ; their general appearance was satisfactory : the oakum-shop was almost filled by men seated on benches and picking oakum. The hours of work are from six in the morning to six in the evening in summer, and from eight until four in winter, allowing half an hour for breakfast, and one hour for dinner; persons eighty years of age and upwards are exempted from any labour, but from all under that age and in health, a task is required in proportion to their ability and strength; those who, from age or infirmity, have a limited task, are allowed to choose their own time for performing it, and used formerly to pick the oakum in their own rooms; but owing to the risk of fire, this practice has been discontinued, and all this work must now be done in the shop. A full measure of employment is exacted from the able-bodied, the object being to discourage laziness, and, as the governor expressed it, to "work them out." The consequence is, that not more than twenty of the inmates were able-bodied men. The aged people appeared the most cheerful inmates ; the avowed principle of management is to make them and the young most comfortable. The women were all employed, chiefly in sewing, attending to the young children, acting as nurses, and performing household offices.
A general appearance of order and discipline prevails throughout the establishment. The governor, who is a steady systematic man, stated that 1000 or 1800 paupers were as easily managed as 500. He has two salaried clerks, a schoolmaster, and two weavers acting as overlookers, who receive salaries; and the governor's wife has two paid female assistants ; the rest of the establishment is conducted by paupers selected from the inmates.
A fever hospital, a detached building, for 140 patients, is supported by the parish, within the walls, and forms part of the workhouse establishment ; the diet, wine, &c. for the patients, materially increase the general expenditure; female paupers act as nurses, and having some privileges in consequence, are usually desirous to be so employed. The total weekly cost, including provisions, clothing, and all the expense of the establishment was last year, 3s. 2d. per head ; but as there was an extraordinary item of 1426l. for buildings, perhaps 3s. may be considered a fair estimate, communibus annis. The weekly cost for provisions and clothing was 2s. 2d. per head.
The following tables show the fluctuation and employments of the population in the workhouse:

On the 25th of March, 1831, there were in the house 1696
During the year ending 25th of March, 1832, admitted 2962
4678
During the year, Discharged 2540
Dead 477
3017
Remaining in the house 25th of March, 1832 1661

Ages of the inmates: Under 15 years 589
15 to 40 242
40 to 50 135
above 50 695
695
1661
Aged, infirm, and sick, not able to work 437
Aged and infirm employed 426
Able-bodied under sixty years of age
employed (males 67, females 142) 209
Children employed 159
Children not employed 430
1661

Of this number, 639 were males and 1022 females, the average number in the house throughout the year was 1648, being about 1 per cent of the population of the town.

After 1834
copied and pasted from i  my liverpool home
Barbie

Good info there SM ta

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