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Alice

Find a Surname

Anyone interested in looking up their surname!

http://www.surnamedb.com/
John Rex

just noticed this one Alice
thanks its really good




J.R.
Alice

Yes J.R. I put my family tree surnames in and realised I am a bit of a mongrel  Laughing
brainbox

Alice, I agree that's an interesting link, I can't really comment on your above statement about being a Mongrel , but I always had the sneaking  suspicion you may be Barking Mad  . Laughing  Laughing .

For a bit of Fun I decided to enter the Surname of our current  Head Honcho Mr. Cameron.....have a go yourself, the first three lines of the description of his name are very interesting indeed.    Shocked
Alice

brainbox wrote:
Alice, I agree that's an interesting link, I can't really comment on your above statement about being a Mongrel , but I always had the sneaking  suspicion you may be Barking Mad  . Laughing  Laughing .

For a bit of Fun I decided to enter the Surname of our current  Head Honcho Mr. Cameron.....have a go yourself, the first three lines of the description of his name are very interesting indeed.    Shocked


Oh yes, crooked and bent, that is our David!  Evil or Very Mad
Barbie

Last name: Jones


This famous surname, widespread throughout the British Isles, and the most popular surname in Wales, one in ten Welsh people being so-called, is nethertheless of English medieval origins. It derives either from the male given name John, or its female equivalent Joan, both Norman French introductions after the 1066 Invasion. Both names are written as Jon(e) in medieval documents, and a clear distinction between them on the grounds of gender was not made until the 15th Century. However, because western society has almost invariably had a male as family head throughout history, bearers of the surname Jones are more likely to derive it from a patronymic form of John, than a matronymic form of Joan. The personal name John, ultimately from the Hebrew "Yochanan" meaning "Jehovah has favoured (me with a son)", has always enjoyed enormous popularity in Europe, and particularly so after the famous Crusades of the 12th century. The name, which is found in some four hundred spellings, is in honour of St. John the Baptist, the precursor of Christ. The surname as "Jones", first appears on record in England in the latter part of the 13th Century, and also features as one of the most numerous settler names in Ireland, having been introduced in the wake of the Anglo- Norman Invasion of 1170. It is now found in every Irish county, especially in the larger towns, and has also been Gaelicized as "MacSeoin". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Matilda Jones, which was dated 1273, in the "Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire", during the reign of King Edward 1st, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", reigned 1272 - 1307
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I was born a Jones and I will die a Jones. Bob amser yn fy meddyliau dad.♥
Alice

My grandmother was a Smith and such a hard name to trace particularly when her father was born in Scotland!

Last name: Smith
Recorded in the spellings of Smith, Smithe, Smythe, and the patronymics Smiths, and Smithson, this is the most popular surname in the English speaking world by a considerable margin. Of pre 7th century Anglo-Saxon origins, it derives from the word 'smitan' meaning 'to smite' and as such is believed to have described not a worker in iron, but a soldier, one who smote. That he also probably wore armour, which he would have been required to repair, may have lead to the secondary meaning. The famous Anglo-Saxon Chronicles sometimes known as the first newspaper, in the 9th century a.d. uses the expression 'War-Smith' to describe a valiant warrior, whilst the later medieval Guild List of specialist trades has blacksmith, whitesmith, tinsmith, goldsmith and silversmith amongst its many members, but no trade of 'smith'. These descriptions of the skilled workers of the Middle Ages were exact, and it is our opinion after studying many early records that the original smiths were probably the guards of the local lord of the manor. This would account for the singular popularity of the name, as the early social records indicate that the trades of tailor and baker were much more prevalent than that of Smith in any form. What is certain is that over five hundred coats of arms have been granted to Smith nameholders, surely an indication of the soldier background, rather than a humble ironworker. The great family Smith is 'first' in all major cities of the English speaking world, yet curiously the greatest concentration of Smith's are in Aberdeenshire, Scotland! Why this should be so is far from clear. Not surprisingly the Smith name was one of the very first into the New American colonies, being held by the famous John Smith (1580 - 1631), explorer and writer, who helped to found the state of Virginia. He was reputedly saved from execution by Pocahontas, the Indian chief's daughter, who died in England in 1622. The first recorded spelling of the family name, and probably the first surname recorded anywhere in the world, is that of Eceard Smid. This was dated 975 a.d., in the English Surname Register for County Durham, during the reign of King Edward of England, known as "The Martyr", 975 - 979 a.d.
Alice

Another website for finding the meaning of surnames

http://forebears.co.uk/surnames

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