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Liverpool Women at War

how the women at home did their bit for the war effort

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.u...ames-quizzes/blitz/1500_info.html
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On 4th August, 1914, Britain declared war on Germany. Two days later the National Union of Woman's Suffrage Societies announced that it was suspending all political activity until the war was over. The leadership of the Women's Social and Political Union began negotiating with the British government. On the 10th August the government announced it was releasing all suffragettes from prison. In return, the WSPU agreed to end their militant activities and help the war effort. The Women's Freedom League disagreed and continued with its campaign for the vote.

Some leaders of the WSPU such as Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughter, Christabel Pankhurst, played an important role as speakers at meetings to recruit young men into the army. Others like Sylvia Pankhurst were opposed to the war and refused to carry out this role. Some members of the WSPU disagreed with the decision to call off militant activities. For example, Kitty Marion was so angry she went to the USA to help American women in their fight for the vote.
Women filled many jobs brought into existence by wartime needs. As a result the number of women employed increased from 3,224,600 in July, 1914 to 4,814,600 in January 1918. Nearly 200,000 women were employed in government departments. Half a million became clerical workers in private offices. Women worked as conductors on trams and buses. A quarter of a million worked on the land. The greatest increase of women workers was in engineering. Over 700,000 of these women worked in the highly dangerous munitions industry. Industries that had previously excluded women now welcomed them. There was a particular demand for women to do heavy work such as unloading coal, stoking furnaces and building ships.

Courtesy of John Simkin
Barbie

Both world wars 1 and 2 altered the way in which we lived as a nation didn't it? Then the 50's saw women as 'little housewives and mothers'. Well, there were a lot of dead men to replace! Husband's tea on the table when he got in.....aaaarrrgghhhhh...just no! These days there are lots of house husbands while she goes out to work. Good stuff!  Wink
Lizzie

Excellent link......the war sure did give women a new way of life .....albeit a hard one....

I read a wonderful article once about women who flew Lancaster bombers out to the RAF .....wherever they were needed under very harsh and dangerous flying conditions...

After the war one women wanted to continue flying but was told that they would not accept women pilots...... Shocked  go figure.....must see if I can find the article on line any where to post it
Alice

Lizzie wrote:
Excellent link......the war sure did give women a new way of life .....albeit a hard one....

I read a wonderful article once about women who flew Lancaster bombers out to the RAF .....wherever they were needed under very harsh and dangerous flying conditions...

After the war one women wanted to continue flying but was told that they would not accept women pilots...... Shocked  go figure.....must see if I can find the article on line any where to post it


In many ways women earned their equality and isn't that typical of men Lizzie.  They were alright when they were needed!

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