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Alice

WORLD WAR TWO

An interesting story

The Forgotten women prisoners of war

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/...-forgotten-women-prisoners-of-war
Barbie

Thanks Alice. Good link. Not often you hear about the women.
brainbox

Thanks Alice that was a Harrowing short account of the terrible conditions in a Wartime Nazi Camp, The book should be a very interesting one indeed
Alice

There are some very good war articles in the Express.  If I see any more I will put the links up.
brainbox

Thanks Alice, there appears to be no end to the repercussions of wartime events even after all this time.. War is so inhuman.
Lizzie

Going to get a copy of that book..thanks for the link Alice
Alice

Wartime child escaped the Nazis by hiding under her nanny's skirt
RENATA CALVERLEY was trapped in the Jewish ghetto in Poland until an audacious plan was hatched to set her free

Renata Calverley was almost two years old when German troops marched into Poland in September 1939 and her life changed completely.

She had no idea why, of course, but the adults around her, previously happy and carefree, became anxious and serious.

Letters to her father who was serving with the Polish army were returned unread. Food became scarce. Yellow stars appeared on the family's coats. "I thought they were to protect us," recalls Renata, 76, who lives in Oxford.

In June 1942 soldiers arrived at the family's apartment in the city of Przemysl early one morning. Her mother Tosia helped her daughter dress and thrust a doll into her arms. The little girl noticed her mother's hands were shaking.

At gunpoint Tosia, Renata and her grandmother were marched to a squalid room in the Jewish ghetto where for the next 18 months she would wait, hungry and homesick, while her mother and grandmother worked alternate factory shifts.

http://www.express.co.uk/life-sty...s-hiding-under-her-nanny-s-skirts
brainbox

More Wartime Memories...........

.." When the Second World War was declared on Sunday 3rd September 1939 I was nineteen years old and living in Liverpool with my parents and two sisters Thelma and Mavis. Thelma was fifteen and Mavis eight years old. I remember sitting around the wireless set with my family, listening to the Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, announcing that Great Britain was at war with Germany. I wondered what on earth was going to happen to us all and how soon it would be before our happy home life would be affected. I was soon to find out!

A blackout was announced immediately, all the streetlights went out, no lights in shop windows were allowed and blackout curtains had to be put up in all houses and public buildings. Only dim blue lights were permitted on public transport. Woe-be-tide anyone who should show a light after dark! The Air Raid Wardens would soon rap on the door and tell you about it.

We soon learned to carry a torch as Liverpool was plunged into darkness each night. Barrage balloons appeared in the sky over the city and trenches were dug in the parks and recreation grounds. Street air raid shelters were erected and Anderson shelters were provided to householders with space in their gardens. The council workmen delivered ours in pieces. It was made of corrugated iron and my father put it up with some difficulty, at the bottom of our garden and covered the top with old carpets and soil. We fitted out the inside with boxes to sit on and an old mat over the entrance. It was very cold in there in the winter and pitch black but it saved our lives on many occasions when the air raids started in earnest in 1940."....
Alice

Interesting read B.B.
Alice

I read today, that in 1939, ten million people in Britain were eligible to have steel air raid shelters built for free if they were unable to afford them.

I always thought they were free for everybody who needed them.
Barbie

Beeb, good perspective there from a young 'un. May I ask where that is from? Is it a book I could purchase?

Alice, if people were charged for the air raid shelters then how bloody bad was that? Civi street didn't ask to go to war.
Alice

Very interesting webiste featuring World Famous Trials

Nuremberg Trials 1945-1949

http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/nuremberg/nuremberg.htm
brainbox

Barbie wrote:
Beeb, good perspective there from a young 'un. May I ask where that is from? Is it a book I could purchase?

Alice, if people were charged for the air raid shelters then how bloody bad was that? Civi street didn't ask to go to war.


Barbie, It wasnt a book cos I have copied & Pasted it , but I think I must be going nuts cos I cant recall were I lifted it from..........Ill get back to you if I can once again find the source.

Alice was the figure 10 Million People and not 10 million homes ? cos if it was the latter then that would probably have covered everyone in the country .
Alice

brainbox wrote:
Barbie wrote:
Beeb, good perspective there from a young 'un. May I ask where that is from? Is it a book I could purchase?

Alice, if people were charged for the air raid shelters then how bloody bad was that? Civi street didn't ask to go to war.


Barbie, It wasnt a book cos I have copied & Pasted it , but I think I must be going nuts cos I cant recall were I lifted it from..........Ill get back to you if I can once again find the source.

Alice was the figure 10 Million People and not 10 million homes ? cos if it was the latter then that would probably have covered everyone in the country .


B.B. it could be a typing error although I am sure it said homes, after all an air raid shelter is per home not person, isn't it!  Laughing
brainbox

Alice
Quote:


B.B. it could be a typing error although I am sure it said homes, after all an air raid shelter is per home not person, isn't it!  Laughing


Alice  you said 'People'  in the original Post.. Do you mean that it did actually say 'Homes in the Article you read ?
Alice

brainbox wrote:
Alice
Quote:


B.B. it could be a typing error although I am sure it said homes, after all an air raid shelter is per home not person, isn't it!  Laughing


Alice  you said 'People'  in the original Post.. Do you mean that it did actually say 'Homes in the Article you read ?


I don't have the link but I should imagine what I typed is what I read but that doesn't mean that I agree with it B.B.

In the meantime I came across this website which is rather interesting.

http://www.localhistories.org/secondlife.html
brainbox

Thats a very informative website Alice, Ta !
The only downside of it is that the Author ,like so many others has brought out his airbrush and used it on Merseyside,,, When will this insult and injustice on the brave people of this area during WW2 ever be righted.... Here is what I am referring to, taken from that link..........What do you see wrong with it that is an utter disgrace...

...."  On 7 September 1940 the Germans began bombing London and by 1 January 1941 over 13,000 Londoners were killed. Other cities heavily bombed during the 'blitz' included Birmingham, Coventry, Bristol, Portsmouth and Plymouth."

Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad
Barbie

.....and we did the same to them....pointless wars.
MOJO

brainbox wrote:
Thats a very informative website Alice, Ta !
The only downside of it is that the Author ,like so many others has brought out his airbrush and used it on Merseyside,,, When will this insult and injustice on the brave people of this area during WW2 ever be righted.... Here is what I am referring to, taken from that link..........What do you see wrong with it that is an utter disgrace...

...."  On 7 September 1940 the Germans began bombing London and by 1 January 1941 over 13,000 Londoners were killed. Other cities heavily bombed during the 'blitz' included Birmingham, Coventry, Bristol, Portsmouth and Plymouth."

Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad  Evil or Very Mad


I don't think it will ever be truly recognised now,B.B. Whatever the reasoning behind this pathetic cover-up, at the time, it should have been well accepted by now!  Mad
                                       I'd love to find out what the official government attitude towards the city was then,....and even now!?
Alice

Some information about the bombing.  I know Coventry got it bad but was it worse than Liverpool?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blitz

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/h...ber/15/newsid_3522000/3522785.stm
MOJO

Bootle was the most heavily bombed area, in the whole country! Official records, have accepted censored wartime propaganda, as truth!  Mad
Alice

WORLD WAR II as it happened

Death railway bridge built like ‘a pack of cards’

On the Railway of Death that the Japanese were forcing POWs to build through the jungles of Burma and Siam there was no respite. Australian Don McLaren had survived the nightmare journey by box car up to the jungle camps from Singapore.

http://ww2today.com/1st-april-194...bridge-built-like-a-pack-of-cards
Alice

A HERO pilot from the Dambusters squadron who helped to sink the feared Nazi battleship Tirpitz during the Second World War has died at the age of 90.

John “Des” Phillips joined legendary 617 Squadron as a 20-year-old in 1944, a year after the raids on dams in Germany which made it famous.

He took part in later RAF attacks on U-boat pens, Nazi rocket sites in the Pas de Calais, and the Berchtesgaden mountain retreat of Adolf Hitler.

But his claim to fame was the part he played in three raids on the Tirpitz, the sister ship to the Bismarck.

A historian revealed how Des single-handedly prevented disaster for his crew during the third of the attacks.

In his 1986 book, 617 Squadron: The Dambusters At War, Tom Bennett told how Des’s grossly overloaded Lancaster bomber struggled to get off the ground on their mission to sink the 53,000-ton enemy ship in 1944.

He wrote: “The aircraft was taking off with 14,000lb overload when the port outer engine cut to less than half power.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/...28Daily+Express+%3A%3A+UK+Feed%29
Alice

The tragedy of Slapton Sands: The real story of that terrible night

IN THE early days of May 70 years ago the sea on the South Devon coast was washing up American corpses after one of the worst disasters of the Second World War.

The dead soldiers were hastily removed and interred in conditions of utmost secrecy.

The complete truth of what happened is still unknown.

But the idyllic Slapton Sands in Lyme Bay was once the scene of terrible carnage in the run up to D-Day.

At the end of 1943 around 3,000 people in several villages in what is now known as the South Hams area of Devon were given six weeks to leave their homes with no explanation. They didn't know it but they were making way for an invasion.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/...real-story-of-that-terrible-night
brainbox

What a brave man Des was, and such a hero, we are all indebted to him for his dedication to his duty in defending our coubtry in time of need..pleased to see he lived a long and enjoyable life after WW2 and headed a lovely big family who I am sure will keep his name and the memory of his deeds alive for future generations to wonder at and to admire

And what a horrific but absoluterly amazing story of the events at Slapton Sands during the build up top D Day.

Thanks for these articles Alice, they made for a fascinating Sunday morning read
Alice

Forbidden Diary of a Wartime Nurse

Following closely in their wake were medical personnel, among them Mary Mulry, of Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserves, known as the QAs.

She never fired a shot but her experience of war was as intense as that of any infantryman.

She nursed the servicemen and civilians wounded in the evacuation from Dunkirk and the horribly burned Battle Of Britain fighter pilots.

She subsequently twice escaped death during the Blitz in London.

As the Allied forces advanced from Normandy so did Mary into Belgium, where she cared for survivors of the disastrous assault on Arnhem, and into Germany where she witnessed the utter destitution of the defeated nation.

Working so close to the frontline she heard the first reports of the horrors of Bergen-Belsen, which was liberated by British troops, and when posted to Hamburg she attended the trial of the guards at Ravensbrück, the women's concentration camp.

Yet she was still able to feel compassion for German prisoners of war.

Rationing meant she was often faint with hunger and feeding patients felt "like torture".

She was also among the first nurses to use a new wonder drug called penicillin.

Yet she also managed to have fun with a large but transient array of admirers, musing wistfully: "I always seem to be saying goodbye to men whom I might have loved had there been enough time."

We know so much about Mary's war because she broke the rules.

Keeping a diary was strictly forbidden while on active service, which makes Mary's remarkably complete account all the more exceptional.

After languishing in the archives of the Imperial War Museum it is now being published as a book.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/...orbidden-diary-of-a-wartime-nurse

A Very Private Diary - A Nurse In Wartime by Mary Morris is published on June 12th by Weidenfield & Nicholson, £14.99 in Harback, £7.99 eBook.
Barbie

Interesting read thanks Alice.
Alice

Over 750,000 loved animals were killed in the first week of the second world war is the subject of a fascinating new book.

http://www.express.co.uk/life-sty...great-cat-dog-massacre-hilda-kean
MOJO1

A sad, but interesting post, Alice!
Valencia

Thanks Alice, I had no idea that happened, very interesting but sad.
Barbie

Crying or Very sad

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