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WORLD WAR ONE CENTENARY
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6916

PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:34 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

40 amazing World War facts

AS the guns finally fell silent at 11am, on November 11, 1918, Private George Edwin Ellison would go down in history as the last British solider to die in the First World War.

Having served four years on the Western Front the 40-year-old was killed at 9.30am, despite the armistice being signed at 5am.

He was one of a staggering 11,000 tragic souls who became casualties on the last day of the war, even though an end to the conflict had already been agreed.

Here, in the run up to Armistice Day and the 100th anniversary of the start of hostilities, we've put together 40 other incredible facts about the 1914-1918 war that was meant to end all wars...

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/441602/40-amazing-World-War-facts
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6916

PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An interesting article from the Sunday Express:

Legacy of the Cursed World War

WATCHING the s*n going down behind The Mall and St James’s Park, the Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey turned to a friend and remarked, “The lamps are going out all over Europe. We shall not see them again in our lifetime.”

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...24/Legacy-of-the-Cursed-World-War
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brainbox



Joined: 21 May 2012
Posts: 10284
Location: out & about in Liverpool

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thousands of people have signed an online petition calling for World War I nurse Edith Cavell to be commemorated on a new £2 coin instead of the now,much discredited Lord Kitchener...>

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-25676858
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6916

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

brainbox wrote:
Thousands of people have signed an online petition calling for World War I nurse Edith Cavell to be commemorated on a new £2 coin instead of the now,much discredited Lord Kitchener...>

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-25676858


It would be richly deserved and I hope it happens for a very brave lady!

There doesn't seem to be a link to the online petition unless I have missed it.
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6916

PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Royal Misfit who Caused the Great War

He was marrying the ravishingly pretty Princess Alexandra, whose father would soon become King Christian IX of Denmark and whose brother was about to be named King George I of Greece.

The Princess Diana of her day, Alexandra was already wildly popular with the British public and it was a dazzling ceremonial occasion.

The event also marked the first public appearance in Britain of the Queen's eldest grandson, four-yearold Prince Wilhelm of Prussia. His mother was Victoria's eldest daughter Vicky while his father Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm (known as Fritz) was heir to the Prussian throne.

Little Wilhelm was a page boy at the wedding but he did not acquit himself well. He was dressed in Highland costume, complete with kilt and toy dagger. When he became restless during the ceremony his uncle the 18-yearold Duke of Edinburgh told him to be quiet. At that point the defiant child drew his blade, threatened his uncle with it then bit him on the leg.

As a new two-part BBC documentary explains, it was to be the beginning of a long, tortured relationship between the future Kaiser of Germany and his British family that would help drag Europe into the abyss and cost 10 million lives in the First World War.

Wilhelm was born in January 1859 in a traumatic breech delivery that left him with a withered left arm. Disability was a badge of shame in fiercely militaristic Prussia and the boy was subjected to grotesque treatments in various bids to "cure" him. His right arm was strapped to his body in a vain attempt to force him to use the other one. When the imbalance in his neck muscles made his head twist, he was strapped into another restrictive machine.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...l-misfit-who-caused-The-Great-War
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brainbox



Joined: 21 May 2012
Posts: 10284
Location: out & about in Liverpool

PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank Alice and your link was extremely interesting and imformative with a couple of really good quality Archive photos.

Here is a Youtube link to a short pice of footage of Basil Rathbone the famous Sherlock Holmes and Relative of the famous Liverpool Rathbones. In the 1957 Interview he relates his experience as an officer during WW1 in the trenches and his early participation in the deployment of the tactic of  Caouflage ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2Fl8zYO9u8
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The war that created Russia's bloody revolution

Even a novelist as gloomy as Tolstoy would hesitate to tell such a sad story. It began badly, it ended worse. At a banquet held in 1894 on Khodynka Field in Moscow to celebrate his coronation, 1,389 people were trampled to death. They had attended after rumours of lavish gifts; these turned out to be bits of bread and sausage. Twenty four years later, in July 1918, the last Romanov monarch was executed by Bolsheviks in a basement in Yekaterinburg.

His wife and five children died with him.

In between times, the Tsar's regime had careered from existential crisis to crisis, none bigger than the Great War he helped foment. The Tsar fondly imagined his army of 1.3million men would "steamroll" Prussian pretensions in Eastern Europe. To his dismay the "steamroller" turned out to be more of a rusty garden roller. His disillusioned, starving people threw in their lot with Lenin's Bolsheviks. The Tsar's murder was the postscript to the regime-changing October Revolution of 1917. Nothing in the Tsar's personality had equipped him to rule, let alone rule a country which rambled across the globe from Poland to the Pacific. Like his father, Alexander III, Nicholas II was a confirmed autocrat, blithely announcing: "I do what I wish and what I wish is good."

His principal pillar in preserving absolutism was the Okhrana, the secret police. Censorship was absolute, to the irritation of the intelligentsia, artists, students and professional middle classes.

Alas for Nicholas II, he did not inherit his father's iron will or his political shrewdness. Nicholas II preferred (and this is almost endearing) to play happy families rather than attend to affairs of the police state. When he was at his desk, his indecision was final. His impressionability was legendary. The most powerful man in Russia, the joke had it, was the last man to have spoken to the Tsar.

Make that the "last woman". He was under the thumb of his wife, Alexandra, who hailed from the insignificant German duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt. Her new position as Empress of all Russians went to her head. Writing in 1905 she opined: "The emperor, unfortunately, is weak, but I am not and I intend to be firm." The Lady Macbeth of Russia encouraged her husband's worst trait: His belief in a God-given right to rule.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...reated-Russia-s-bloody-revolution
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6916

PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was on the news today about Lizzie the Elephant who was seconded to do 'horse' work in Sheffield during WW1.  Most of the horses were need elsewhere and Lizzie did such vital work for the war effort.

http://www.nfa.dept.shef.ac.uk/jungle/index4d3.html


Last edited by Alice on Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
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brainbox



Joined: 21 May 2012
Posts: 10284
Location: out & about in Liverpool

PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great Article about Lizzie . I wonder what did happen to her .
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MOJO



Joined: 30 May 2012
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Location: Anfield

PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2014 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did anyone watch the 2 consecutive prog's, on the great war, the other night, with Max Hastings narrating? It seems that taking everything into account, war really was inevitable!
                                                  It also demonstrated that the germans had quite a vicious, cruel streak in them, then, and this was without, the influence of Hitler, the S.S. the Gestapo, etc, which are the stated reasons behind the atrocities of W.W.2. Makes you wonder!

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