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WORLD WAR ONE CENTENARY
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brainbox



Joined: 21 May 2012
Posts: 10284
Location: out & about in Liverpool

PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:30 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

I saw only part of the first one MOJO  it was on quite late in the evening and I thought it was an excellent programme. Max Hastings did a much better job of it than the one Jeremy Paxton has done. I intend to try and see the Max Hastings programmes on  the 'I-player'  play it again thingy. I was also surprised and shocked to learn how aggressive and Barbaric the German Military and Government were during the years leading up to WW1.
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Grow with pride: The reason we remember WWI with poppies

IN 1916 an American airman called James McConnell observed the Battle of Verdun from the sky. Although the carnage of North-east France looked weirdly still from that distance the overwhelming impression was one of devastation.

“Peaceful fields and farms and villages adorned that landscape a few months ago,” he wrote in his memoir Flying For France.

“Now there is only that sinister brown belt, a strip of murdered Nature. It seems to belong to another world. Every sign of humanity has been swept away. The woods and roads have vanished like chalk wiped from a blackboard, of the villages nothing remains but grey smears where stone walls have tumbled together.”

The destruction on all the First World War battlefields was total. Every account spoke of the sea of mud and the elimination of any distinguishing features in the landscape.

For troops in the trenches the only other living things they would encounter, apart from fellow soldiers, were rats, mice or lice.

But one miracle of nature did survive. The conditions perfectly suited an annual herb called papaver rhoeas, whose seeds can lie dormant in the soil for more than 80 years before germinating.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...ason-we-remember-WWI-with-poppies
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Barbie



Joined: 22 May 2012
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I enjoyed reading that Alice. I adore poppies. Thanks.
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Alice



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2014 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The killing of Franz Ferdinand: A single shot that unleashed hell on earth

He was the teenage Bosnian Serb who, on that sunlit Sunday in June a century ago, dispatched to Heaven (or was it Hell?) Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. A single bullet from his Browning FN 7.65mm pistol ruptured Ferdinand's carotid artery and triggered The Great War.

Today in Bosnia and other shattered remnants of the former Yugoslavia there are many who regard Princip as a national hero; the freedom-fighter, the little guy who fought back against the imperialist Hapsburgs, oppressors of the Serbs.

Princip is the pin-up boy of modern terrorists, the ultimate proof that a single assassin can alter the run of history.

Meanwhile some historians mark him as a patsy, the unwitting tool of Serbia, Russia or Germany. Princip himself confessed at his trial to being a "nationalist", yet also declaimed class-based anarchism.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...shot-that-unleashed-hell-on-earth
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Alice



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Private WC Tickle and the boys of the First World War
HE was only 15 when he volunteered but the young face grinning out from a new stamp was just one of many underage soldiers who lied about their age to fight for their country

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...d-the-boys-of-the-First-World-War
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Barbie



Joined: 22 May 2012
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fifteen....so proud to be a soldier of his country. They looked and acted older than today's youth. The feral youth of today act so hard but you know what, they'd pooh themselves in that situation!
R.I.P. brave soldier boy Tickle.
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Alice



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A MOTHER'S DAY TRIBUTE

Mother reunited at last with her First World War hero son
WITH Mother’s Day coming up this weekend, a heartbreaking story of a parent who made a secret pact to share her boy’s grave

On a chilly autumn afternoon in 1929 a chauffeur-driven car pulled into the Lijssenthoek military cemetery in Flanders. Head groundsman Walter Sutherland initially paid little attention as a finely dressed woman stepped out. More than a decade after the Great War such pilgrimages by grief-stricken widows and mothers were common.

Sutherland glanced up ready to direct the visitor to one of the 11,000 identical stone graves. Once there she would, like most who had preceded her, weep and lay flowers. However there was something about the woman’s purposeful stride and dry-eyed demeanour that alerted the worker that this was no ordinary mourner.

Introducing herself as Harriette Raphael the woman outlined her extraordinary proposal. She explained that she was the mother of Lieutenant John Raphael who had been killed at the Battle of Messines Ridge in Belgium in June 1917 and buried at Lijssenthoek.

Now in poor health her one remaining wish was to be laid to rest alongside her beloved only son. Mrs Raphael knew very well that military rules of the period strictly forbade such requests, explaining her decision to go directly to the gardener rather than making an official approach to the Imperial War Graves Commission.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...with-her-First-World-War-hero-son
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brainbox



Joined: 21 May 2012
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What an emotion packed story, War destroys lives far beyond that of the fallen themselves.
Thanks for sharing the insight into that particular example,Alice.
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Barbie



Joined: 22 May 2012
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Alice.
Wars are so unnecessary and nobody is a real winner.
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Alice



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2014 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

THE SEVEN BROTHERS SENT TO WAR

The elderly woman sitting on the railway bench was in deep distress. “My boys, my boys... where are my boys?” she muttered over and over again. When she failed to respond to the gentle enquiries of the station assistant he looked in her handbag to find some identification and instead found a letter from Buckingham Palace dated 1915.

With trembling hands he opened the envelope and read the following words written six years earlier: “Madam, I am commanded by the King to convey to you an expression of His Majesty’s appreciation of the patriotic spirit which has prompted your five sons to give their services at the present time to the British Armed Services.” It was then that he noticed four black velvet strips sewn on to the woman’s crepe jacket – mourning ribbons – each one representing the loss of a man. Seven of Elizabeth Cranston’s sons enlisted to fight in the First World War.

Four were killed, two were severely wounded and their youngest brother bore the scars of guilt and heartbreak for the rest of his life. Worst affected was Lizzie whose world fell apart as her beloved sons failed to return one by one from the battlefields of France and Belgium. Scotland has the highest casualty rate per head of population of the home nations that fought in the Great War but few families sacrificed as much as this proud hard-working family from Haddington, East Lothian, about 20 miles east of Edinburgh.

And there their story might have ended were it not for Lizzie’s great grandson Stuart Pearson whose grandmother was Lizzie’s daughter Agnes. He was determined to research his family’s incredible sacrifice and has now told their story in a new book titled Blood On The Thistle. “Lizzie’s surviving children did not talk about their experience because they did not want to address the issue,” says Stuart, 62, whose grandmother Agnes died the year before he was born.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...lost-four-sons-in-First-World-War

To buy Blood On The Thistle by Stuart Pearson and Bob Mitchell, published by John Blake £17.99 with free P&P call 0871 988 8451. Visit expressbooks.co.uk or send a cheque/PO (payable to The Express) to: The Express Orders Dept, 1 Broadland Business Park, Norwich NR7 0WF

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