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WORLD WAR ONE CENTENARY
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6915

PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2014 5:20 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

The gun shot that killed Franz Ferdinand launched the Great War and was felt worldwide

After days of rain, Sunday June 28, 1914, broke bright in Sarajevo. The only thing bluer than  the sky was the military tunic of Archduke Franz Ferdinand as he climbed into the Graf & Stift convertible at the town’s barracks.

It was a good day for the heir to the sprawling Austro-Hungarian Empire to conclude his visit to the province of Bosnia-Herzegovina. The s*n was bringing out the crowds; it was important to be seen, for a little imperial magic to be cast over the people who would one day be his subjects.

Beside the Archduke, on the back seat, sat his beloved wife Sophie. Despised as a parvenu by Franz Ferdinand’s aged uncle, the Emperor, the Viennese court treated Sophie as if she was staff. Out here in the sticks she got to play an archduchess properly. Even so, in the calendar in her head the date June 28 rankled.

On this day in 1900 her husband had been forced by the Imperial court to take a morganatic oath, which excluded their children from any claim to the throne.

Sophie pulled down the bonnet on her head. There was a slight breeze. She tucked a bouquet of blood red roses into her sash.

At exactly 10am the convoy of cars containing the royal party turned out of the barracks’ yard. Cannon boomed a “24-fold salute”. Soon the royal cavalcade reached the town’s main boulevard, the Appel Quai, flanked by buildings on one side and the Miljacka on the other, although at this time of year the river was barely a trickle. The s*n’s rays bounced blindingly off the Ottoman minarets on the skyline.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...arted-the-Great-War-100-years-ago
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6915

PostPosted: Sat Aug 02, 2014 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The friends who fought and died together

While the miners were working underground a table was placed at the entrance of Houghton Main colliery. Behind it sat an Army recruiting officer and as the men emerged blinking into the light they were asked to sign up and go to war. They needed little persuasion and scores put pen to paper that day in Barnsley in August 1914, becoming brothers in arms.

The miners and other workers from the Yorkshire town were lured by the offer of regular pay, three meals a day and the adventure of a lifetime with their best mates. Few wanted to miss out on the scrap against the Hun and in any case it was being predicted that it would be over by Christmas.

Throughout the land there were similar scenes in market squares, at factories and outside football grounds. The idea of encouraging brothers, neighbours and work colleagues to fight side by side helped swell the ranks of the Army by 350,000 in the first few months of the First World War. The term Pals Battalion was coined to describe these forces of likeminded men and on the busiest single day 33,000 new soldiers enlisted.

Liverpool, which provided four such battalions, was the first to answer the call and the idea captured the imagination of the nation. The recruitment drive, in response to Lord Kitchener's rallying cries of "Your country needs you" and "Join your country's army", was a huge success.

The story of the Pals Battalions is told in an Imperial War Museum North exhibition and an ITV documentary tomorrow.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...ends-who-fought-and-died-together
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Alice



Joined: 12 Jun 2012
Posts: 6915

PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The battle to feed Tommy: New exhibition looks at the diet of a WW1 soldier

They say an army marches on its stomach, so feeding the two million men who were in the trenches at the height of the First World War was some task. It was a great achievement that in the entire conflict not one British soldier starved to death.

Yet no one should think that the Tommies enjoyed the food that was served up by the military. According to the wags on the frontline, the biggest threat to life was not German bullets but the appalling rations.

Most despised was Maconochie, named after the company in Aberdeen that made this concoction of barely recognisable chunks of fatty meat and vegetables in thin gravy.

When served hot, as per the instructions on the tin, it was said to be barely edible. Eaten cold for days on end in the trenches, where a warm meal was usually no more than a fantasy, it was said to be disgusting.

It was the stated aim of the British Army that each soldier should consume 4,000 calories a day. At the frontline, where conditions were frequently appalling, daily rations comprised 9oz of tinned meat (today it would be known as corned beef but during the First World War it was called bully beef) or the hated Maconochie.

Additionally the men received biscuits (made from salt, flour and water and likened by the long-suffering troops to dog biscuits). They were produced under government contract by Huntley & Palmers, which in 1914 was the world's largest biscuit manufacturer. The notoriously hard biscuits could crack teeth if they were not first soaked in tea or water.

Other rations included cheese, tea, jam, sugar, salt and condensed milk.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/wor...d-Tommy-The-diet-of-a-WW1-soldier
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MOJO



Joined: 30 May 2012
Posts: 4992
Location: Anfield

PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As bad as it sounds, I'm sure the germans would have appreciated those rations, especially towards the latter part of the war, when the british blockade, really started to bite!
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MOJO



Joined: 30 May 2012
Posts: 4992
Location: Anfield

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some fascinating pic's of various WW1 soldiers, which were discovered in a French attic! They're attempting to identify as many as they can!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/a...ghNQW2LJhx1SsX0t/the-lost-tommies

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